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Easy Neck-Strengthening Exercises You Can Perform While at Work






     Neck pain is an all-too-familiar condition, and something that is experienced each day at work by countless individuals. While some may feel it's the type of labor that brings about the issue, the truth of the matter is that people sitting at a desk in an air-conditioned environment can experience neck pain just the same as a laborer at the local shipping yard can. While neck pain is a common problem that can become present in just about anyone, the good news is there are a few simple neck-strengthening exercises you can perform while at work that can help alleviate minor, existing neck pain and prevent pain from even occurring.

Chin Tuck

One of the easiest neck strengthening exercises that can be performed is the chin tuck. This exercise is designed to strengthen the muscles that pull the head back into alignment over the shoulders, and it is ideal to begin when you initially experience pain in your neck. This relatively light exercise can be done numerous times throughout the day though it is recommended that you not do it more than seven times per day and can even be performed while sitting at your desk at work. In addition to alleviating minor neck pain by strengthening your neck muscles, numerous repetitions of the chin tuck exercise can help you develop good postural habits.

When you first begin doing the chin tuck, it is recommended to do so while standing with your spine against a door jam, standing straight up with your feet about three inches from the bottom of the door jamb. Tuck your chin into your chest. Then, while keeping your spine firmly against the door jamb, pull your head back until the back of your head touches the door jamb, making sure that your chin is down so that your head is pulled straight back and not looking up. Hold this position for five seconds. Then, repeat the exercise until you've completed 10 repetitions. Once you've done this exercise a few times, you can begin performing it while standing or sitting without the door jamb.

Hands-on-Head Exercises

There are several isometric exercises to strengthen your neck using only your hands, and all can be done while you are at work no matter what type of job you have. Appropriately termed hands-on-head exercises allow you to strengthen your neck's muscles without any movement, with different exercises targeting the muscles in the sides, front, and back of your neck. Successfully performing hands-on-head neck exercises can significantly improve the strength of the muscles in your neck, helping prevent neck pain and even alleviating minor neck pain in some instances. In each of the following outlined exercises, it is key to hold the position for about six or seven seconds, then release and rest for up to 10 seconds. You should then repeat the exercise between eight and 12 times.

To exercise the muscles in the front of your neck, put the palms of both hands against your forehead, with the heels just above your eyebrows. While pressing your hands firmly against your head, firmly press your head against your hands. Do not press as hard as you can, because the object is to create tension but not enough that causes you to tip your head forward. Next, to strengthen the muscles in the back of your neck, lace your fingers together and place your hands on the back of your head, with your head resting in your palms. Press your head against your hands while also firmly pressing your hands against your head, making sure you do not tip your head back. Finally, to increase the strength in the muscles in the side of your neck, follow these simple instructions: For the muscles in the right side of your neck, place your right hand to the right side of your head, just above your ear. At the same time, press firmly with your hand against your head and your head against your hand, being mindful not to move your head to either side. You should feel the muscles at the side of your neck begin to tighten. To strengthen muscles in the left side of your neck, follow the same steps, but pressing your left hand against the left side of your head.
John Soland is an experienced writer who has written for a number of notable publications. As a lifestyle expert, Mr. Soland is able to offer advice and insight on a multitude of topics, including those pertaining to physical therapy.




Article Source: http://www.abcarticledirectory.com


John Soland is an experienced writer who has written for a number of notable publications. As a lifestyle expert, Mr. Soland is able to offer advice and insight on a multitude of topics, including those pertaining to physical therapy.


Posted on 2013-08-18, By: *

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